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Astrology Cosmic Critique Culture & Art Daily Life Ethnic Lore Family & Community Feelings & Emotions Social Issues

Surfacing Inanna

Thank everything almighty!
Inanna is an ancient Mesopotamian goddess associated with love, beauty, sex, war, justice and political power.
It is unimaginably difficult to live hated. Hatred destroys something in humanity that we need to survive. Unfortunately people make choices to hate. Hate is hate. Let’s not pretend it is other than what it is. We all avoid being hated. No one loves to be hated. Hate will never win over what you can become without it. It is possible to live without hate. Everyone needs to find answers for themselves. We can’t be looking for answers for other people and that can’t be our job. Each person needs to be ready to ask a question and to seek the answers. The looking within is everyone’s individual job. It is relevant what we keep and what we let go off in life. Grace guides those who are with grace. I believe in the good in the world. With repetition love overcomes hatred, leading to lasting peace.
Inanna's mythical story is a big part of my life. Now I am going to be able to exit the underworld. 
Calling in the feminine light of support.

Categories
Cosmic Critique Culture & Art Ethnic Lore Feelings & Emotions Grief Life & Death Poetry

Hemingway Story [Poem]

Today on PBS I found an hour long story of Ernest’s Hemingway’s life. I was reminded of his turbulences and many women, recognized writing, noble peace-prize and that he suffered some severe head injuries leading him to dealing with difficult emotions, estrangement and efforts to address mental health. It is painful to hear that his writing is unachievable for others due to the depth of suffering from which he was writing. It is awful that he committed suicide and it is sad that he wasn’t able to win the battle in his life with the demons that haunted him.

I haven’t written anything more than 17 syllables in a while so I decided to sit down and write a poem out of my own suffering to honour the pain of E. Hemingway. I believe after watching this program I will be treasuring myself as a woman more. I am glad I didn’t commit suicide and I am glad I have caring people who support me.

Martyrdom & why you need to love me

It is frightening that you derive joy 
Knowing others are suffering 
it shocks my mind that you only want 
to see pain and laugh about it
I do not see what you do or are thinking as funny, 
we aren't friends, it's not my goal 
i do not want you to misunderstand 
pain you gave to me as a joke. 
I hurt and struggle because of your thinking 
I cant stand another day of unloving uncaring way 
you want to be with me.
Make a full effort to be kind and practice sanity 
towards your relatives, I am not into making you happy 
you feel like you want to vent allover my precious body. 
I don't need or have reasons or need reasons 
for your sense of humour and laughter at unjust 
pain of other people. you do not appreciate martyrdom.
you don't know what to do with one in your life.
Scars remain from knowing you.
Categories
Critique Ethnic Lore Nature Poetry

Spice of life [Poem] [Critique]

In bad taste are things not well mixed or stolen. Authorship may be in question with idea like ‘found poetry’. I am sure it leaves many of us writers unhappy to see things taken out of context, changed into different meaning or devaluating messages. created. Not funny. I don’t like it. The natural view, the clarity obscured. The spice of life taken out and destroyed.


Image from unsplash

Categories
Critique Culture & Art Ethnic Lore Family & Community Feelings & Emotions Nature Poetry Women's Affairs

The Scent Of Green Papaya [Critique]

Synopsis: An Academy Award nominee for Best Foreign Language Film and winner of the Camera D’Or at the Cannes Films Festival, THE SCENT OF GREEN PAPAYA is set in 1951 Saigon, where 10 year old Mui (Lu Man San) enters household service for an affluent but troubled Vietnamese family. Despite her servile role, Mui discovers beauty and epiphany in the lush physical details that envelope her.
Les Productions Lazennec.


Director: Tran Anh Hung

Running Time: 104 min

Year: 1993


It is an unmistakably romantic film for people who live secure with the passing of time.
Filled with director’s nostalgia for the days before the Vietnam war, it is a sweet ripe thing that the French Vietnamese director, Tran Anh Hung, in his first feature film cast his beautiful wife Tran Nu Yên-Khê. While Hung continues to work with his wife in majority of his other films, this being the first feature film, makes it that much sweeter. Winner of the Camera D’Or at the Cannes Films Festival as well as the French national film award, César Award for Best First Work, The Scent Of Green Papaya shows us the journey of a young woman’s life.
The asian culture and its various systems of organizations as well as cultural aesthetics have drawn my attention for all of my adult life. This meeting of a strong Vietnamese culture and strong French culture is visibly woven into the film’s decor, acting, directing and happy love filled ending.
For those who are comfortable with knowing, feeling and living life in the present moment this film evokes reflections about hierarchy, suffering, gender roles, cultural and societal nuances and passing of time.
Showing comparison between the natural world of plants, insects and animals and human world, it is an invitation of how power can be utilized in/by hierarchy.
I like the opening scene of this film along with the details outlining precisely the unfolding events of the film, foreshadowing what is to come. The sensual nature of the film and the detail shown in the film make it a provocatively beautiful and attractive film to watch. Well timed music through the film adds the melodies to the various tensions and feelings the film explores. Early on presenting the father playing Đàn nguyệt (Moon lute), later on the pianist who plays Chopin, as well as the background music and sound of insects make it a palpable experience for the senses. Film’s artistic detail in the art pieces, colours of the interiors and exteriors, arrangements of plants and natural environment, attention to subtlety, finely tuned moments of time make this film a fine work of art.
Perhaps this film invites a natural unfolding of emotional and sensual nature of our delicate hearts.
At minute 7:47 through Mui’s window we are shown a Papaya tree with unripe green papayas.
This fruit periodically is shown cut, washed, cleansed, bathed, sliced, prepared in various ways and its seeds are looked at in wonder. The fruit represents Mui’s young age and her journey over 10 years, her marriage to a Vietnamese pianist, and both pleasant and unpleasant moments of life.
The film unfolds and shows us the ripening in the living world, seeding and sawing our seeds of actions, and the cyclical nature of life through various sensual tensions. These tensions weave into to a melody of Mui’s life, exposing failed tensions (the pilfering and philandering father of the family, and the failed engagement of the pianist man) as well as correct and complete tensions between people.
Through the pleasing physiques of the people, the attention to the grooming and cooking, serving and cleaning, modest and kosher clothing and daily activities timed properly, the rituals of life are showing the passing and coming together of emotions between people, simple exchanges of words, and lives forming and coming apart.
The film is filled with longings and planning for the future and remorse and reflection about the past. The death of the daughter in the family, another relative’s passing is strong thread of this film reflected in the cutting of the fruit of the tree and of killing of insects, eating of meat and the type of conflict that this family faces.
The film sets out within this Vietnamese family to show an interdependence and how the martial tensions, and father-older-mother tension of these Vietnamese parents are affecting their three sons, their marriage and effects their troubles have on Mui and the head servant. Mui quickly learns she resembles the deceased daughter of the man, and happens to possess a happy, modest and beautiful disposition, which lands her a good home and life.
The obviously dark and ritual killing of insects by the middle son, shows the disfunction in the intimacy between the father and the mother and how the the anger is being distributed within the family. This is contrasted by Mui keeping some crickets in a small cage and feeding them as they play. This has to do with the failed sexual tension between father and mother, grieving grandmother and in the formal upbringing of the boys.

The film is provocative and is strongly depicting hierarchy, the roles of men and woman and the weaving of their energies, lacks of reciprocity, lasting bonds, changes and separations, big challenges that we often do not consider in our modern lives.
The film shows these stark grave issues in a tender simple yet clear, typical to asian culture way, the fatherly, motherly and sisterly affection between the relationships in the film weaves them with Mui’s life and happy nature as a servant, intentionally incompletely albeit as she is assigned out of the family after 10 years of her service and brought onto the pianist’s household (a man she mets as a child) as a servant and her beauty, charm, charisma and sensuality destroy another woman’s life and pianist’s engagement when he falls in love with Mui.
This film is lovely in how we are being multicultural, vulnerable, strong, beautiful, mean, and human.